The Tiny House Company Create a Home with a Floating Bed

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Today’s tiny house comes all the way from Australia. Two graduate architects, Lara and Andrew, teamed up with Greg Thornton of Greg Thorton Constructions, to create a tiny house company.

That company, known simply as The Tiny House Company, has gone on to produce a series of tiny house modules, which can be arranged in a variety of ways to create your very own tiny home.

The Pods - Greg Thornton - The Tiny House Company - Australia - Exterior - Humble Homes

From the outset you’re able to distinguish the different components that make up the house as a whole. The black corrugated metal section contains the bathroom pod, while the other part holds the remaining living spaces. As always, with a tiny house, it’s important to take advantage of the exterior space, which they’ve done here with a generous front porch.

The Pods - Greg Thornton - The Tiny House Company - Australia - Floating Bed - Humble Homes

The interior of the house is finished in muted tones, with light walls and dark wood accents. There’s also an organic theme running through the space, with a lot of the rear wall’s shelves being taken up by plants. The main space-saving feature of this home is its floating bed, that’s nested in the ceiling until needed.

The Pods - Greg Thornton - The Tiny House Company - Australia - Interior and Loft - Humble Homes

The living room is set opposite the patio entrance doors. The L-shaped sofa makes use of under seat storage, and the bed hovers above the living room, ready to be lowered by hand. Following the living room, you have a sort of blend between a home office and a kitchen.

The Pods - Greg Thornton - The Tiny House Company - Australia - Kitchen and Study - Humble Homes

At one end, the space is predominantly used as a work station, but further down it flows into the kitchen. Storage units run the length of this section of the home. Half-depth cabinets line the front wall so as to maintain enough elbow room. The bathroom/utility room follows on from the kitchen.

The Pods - Greg Thornton - The Tiny House Company - Australia - Bathroom - Humble Homes

The bathroom comes complete with a walk-in shower, a hand basin, and a washing machine. It’s also, rather unusually, adorned with a coffee machine.

For more tiny houses check out this country-style tiny house by Timbercraft Tiny Homes. Or, this boiler room conversion by Christi Azevedo. See all tiny houses.

Via Contemporist
Photos: The Tiny House Company

5 Comments

  1. The bed that raises at the touch of a button is an interesting feature. I’d be curious how something like this is done. Assuming that there are commercial lifts of some sort out there that could achieve this, but I’ve come up blank in my search. Any ideas from the tiny house community?

  2. I like the idea of small-scale living as shown here but wonder why the use of transportable full-size one-storey units gets less publicity. French TV is currently showing an American series about ‘amateurs’ who buy old transfortable wooden homes (for less that 1000 dollars typically), transport them to a renovation site (around 5000 dollars) and renovate them (10,000 – 15,000 dollars average) and sell them at auctions to people seeking homes (average all-in price usually less than 30,000 dollars). The buyers have to then transport them to their own site and povite the concrete foundations and mains connexions.
    I understand that in some parts of Australia you can take your home with you when you move. The US TV series is shot around Fort Worth should anyone want to investigate. The whole deal seems excellent value for the price and offers ‘normal size’ accommodation (one or two bedrooms, living/kitchen area, bathroom/WC.
    Even using professionals for the renovations the price of labour and materials is much less than in Europe.
    I would be interested in your comments. Thanks. P-DdeR.

  3. Go to YouTube & search for “ceiling bed electric hydraulic pulley” – many, many hits with various methods for raising beds to the ceiling..

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