The Hammock House by UZU Architects

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Located in Osaka, Japan, this family home has been dubbed the “Hammock House” thanks to an outdoor deck that features an area purposely designed for a hammock. The house has a footprint of 51 square meters (549 square feet) and has been created by the local firm, UZU Architects.

Hammock House - Small House - UZU Architects - Osaka Japan - Exterior - Humble Homes

The Hammock House contains three levels to give it a total floor area of 116 square meters (1249 square feet). Like a lot of the other Japanese houses I’ve featured in the past, its set in a rather dense residential district without much space to spare.

Hammock House - Small House - UZU Architects - Osaka Japan - Living Area - Humble Homes

UZU Architects decided to step back from the street to provide space for the family car, but they also lost a little real estate; typically, these types of houses tend to cantilever over the car park area. On the outside, the house features a crisp contemporary finish that also extends to the inside.

Hammock House - Small House - UZU Architects - Osaka Japan - Loft - Humble Homes

The main living area is a brightly light, double height room. It features a walk-around balcony that helps to shade the lower level from light entering through the floor-to-ceiling window units. The living area also contains the kitchen, dining area, living room, toilet, a balcony, and a terrace.

Hammock House - Small House - UZU Architects - Osaka Japan - Hammock - Humble Homes

The terrace serves as a little getaway for chilling out in the hammock. On the ground floor, you’ll find the home’s bedroom, a changing room/bathroom, a clothes closet, and a children’s playroom. There doesn’t seem to be a second bedroom for the children, but perhaps the playroom will be converted into a bedroom over time.

Hammock House - Small House - UZU Architects - Osaka Japan - Floor Plans - Humble Homes

The house is slightly taller than the surrounding buildings, providing it with expansive views, which they take full advantage of with the various deck and balcony areas.

For more Japanese houses check out this simple, but functional house by Takahashi Maki. Or, this house that’s set again a retaining wall. See all Japanese houses.

Via DesignBoom
Photos: Akiyoshi Fukuzawa

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